RaceDeck VooDoo Falcon, 1963.5 Ford Falcon

RaceDeck’s Voodoo Falcon – Is This the Truest “Street Machine” Build?

Leave it up to Jorgen Moller, CEO of SnapLock Industries and makers of RaceDeck flooring, to derive the premise of what he calls the Voodoo Falcon – an idea that’s been stirring in his mind for a few years is now nearing completion. A car that can truly do it all from weekend errand running to week-long road trips, but can also be a terror on any given track.

RaceDeck VooDoo Falcon, 1963.5 Ford Falcon

Usually here on FuelCurve.com we’re featuring finished builds that have claimed a top award at various Goodguys events throughout the country. But when the possibility to showcase some in-progress build photos of the Vooooo Falcon presented itself, we jumped at the opportunity.

RaceDeck VooDoo Falcon, 1963.5 Ford Falcon

“We started with a very clean all original 1963.5 Ford Falcon that was restored and owned by a lifelong Ford Motor Company employee,” Jorgen recently told us. “The restoration was 20+ years old and we wanted to retain as much as possible when it came to paint, body, chrome, etc. to retain a ‘survivor’ feel.”

Jorgen continued, “The plan was to build a car that at first glance appeared to be a nice ‘period’ hotrod but in reality, is packed with a modern-day legendary motor and very track capable chassis and suspension.”

RaceDeck VooDoo Falcon, 1963.5 Ford Falcon

With that in mind, Jorgen reached out to Mike at Mike Maier Inc. who has built a reputation of performance-designed suspension systems for Blue Oval street machines. The Voodoo Falcon received the first Mike Maier Inc. (MMI) Mod 5 front suspension design which utilizes Corvette upper control arms, custom designed and built tubular lower control arms, Detroit Speed spindles, rack & pinion power steering, a shock tower brace, and a well-thought-out geometry design to deliver smooth driving on the open road but also provide optimum traction and handling on an AutoCross or road racing course.

Out back is MMI’s proven Mod 2 three-link rear end setup featuring a Speedway Engineering full floater housing stuffed with a GearFX differential, cantilever JRi double adjustable shocks, and a panhard bar to keep things centered. Tying it all together are full-length Falcon subframe connectors from MMI.

RaceDeck VooDoo Falcon, 1963.5 Ford Falcon

Wilwood disc brakes are on each corner tucked behind a custom set of Forgeline JO3C 3-piece wheels – 18×10 up front and 18×10.5 out back – wrapped in Falken tires.

Handling the bulk of the fabrication work has been Tom Kirkham with Cubic Performance. Kirkham is no stranger to Ford’s, but a Falcon is quite a bit different than the Cobra’s his name is commonly associated with. Tom and his right-hand-man in the shop, Jeremy, were more than up to the task and quickly dove deep into the car tearing it down to the bare bones before transforming it into the street machine it is today.

Wanting to preserve as much of the original exterior as possible, most of the sheet metal work revolved around the four wheel openings. Kirkham carefully designed and welded in wheel flares to fit the wider track width and slightly opened the wheel arches at the same time. To accommodate the Ford 6 speed transmission, a modern Mustang floor pan tunnel was grafted in place.

The power is delivered from a naturally aspirated, but modified, 5.2L flatplane crank Ford Performance GT350r Voodoo engine. It makes roughly 630hp @ 8400rpm and is controlled by a custom HalTech ECU system. Due to space constraints, a remote oil fill was plumbed in and the intake manifold runner control was removed. The oil system was also upgraded with a billet oil pump and an oil vapor separator kit. A custom 2.5-inch stainless X-pipe exhaust system with Borla mufflers routes the exhaust gasses out the back.

RaceDeck VooDoo Falcon, 1963.5 Ford Falcon

Jorgen recently made the short trip over to fellow SLC business, Kindig-It Designs, for Justin at JS Custom Interiors to do his handywork on the inside. The minimal upholstery needs included fresh black carpet, a black leather padded dash, and a set of GTS Classics bucket seats with Crow 5-point harnesses to keep with a vintage Trans Am racing theme he’s be focused on maintaining throughout the build. A Haltech digital display was fitted into the dash to monitor the engine vitals.

The goal with the VooDoo Falcon was an “underspoken” design. A car that you might walk right past in a parking lot, gawk at its paint or chrome flaws, and underestimate when you pull up next to it at a stoplight. But at the same time impress the passenger during a week-long road trip, conquer road imperfections with ease, and thunder around a track to the surprise of your competitors.

RaceDeck VooDoo Falcon, 1963.5 Ford Falcon

Photos Courtesy RaceDeck / Jorgen Moller

Digital Media Editor

A lifelong car kid, Steven grew up around drag strips – his name may sound familiar because his grandfather is Bob Bunker, a Pro Mod pioneer who piloted the “Folsom Flash” ’55 Chevy from the ’70s through the ’90s. Steven’s father, Bob Bunker Jr., heads up Bunker Motorsports and is a regular in the West Coast racing scene, building chassis and race cars for more than 30 years. With genetics like that, it’s no wonder Steven has a passion for both cars and motorsports. In addition to helping his father and honing his fabrication skills at Bunker Motorsports, Steven began shooting photos at the drag strip and capturing the action with his Canon camera. He is now artfully crafting stories around the awesome machines at the shows, as well as the men and women behind them. When he's is not on the road covering events, he spends his downtime out on the water fishing, building his 1962 Chevy Nova, or cruising his 1987 GMC Suburban.